What’s in a Name?

February 1st, 2013

Dear Journalists, Newscasters, Commentators and all those who give us the news and information that helps shape our world view:

You can write and say whatever you want about my generation—all I ask is that you spell our name correctly: B-O-O-M-E-R-S.

Sometimes you mix up my generation with the generation before mine, which is spelled  S-E-N-I-O-R-S.

The Depression, and WWII forged the mettle of today’s seniors.

Boomers were weaned on political assassinations, civil rights, feminism. Our mettle was forged thru cultural flux and turmoil.

“S-e-n-i-o-r-s” are “that” generation” and “B-o-o-m-e-r-s” are “this” generation.

Thanks.

 

Baby Boomers Are Never Going to Retire

October 5th, 2012

 

Baby boomers “retire the word retirement,”  Patricia Marx’s telling  and funny article in the Oct. 8th New Yorker—the  title is “Golden Years.”  Haha.

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/10/08/121008fa_fact_marx

Sign O’ The Times

April 2nd, 2012

I’m sharing the breakfast table with a 23 y/o. I’m reading hard copies of L.A Times and the local paper, and she’s reading the same news on her ipad.

Cathie Black, My Kind Of Boomer

November 30th, 2010

She’s 66, chair of Hearst Magazines, former President and Publisher of USA Today etc. and she’s just been tapped by NYC Mayor Bloomberg to head the City’s public schools as Chancellor.

Does she have any education experience? No.

Has she proven herself as a successful manger of complex organizations? Yes.

Can she play with the big boys? Yes.

She’s entering a new field, at an age when we are supposed to retire.

Now, that’s a role model!

Baby Boomers: Right Time/Right Place

October 11th, 2010
American Birth Trends
American Birth Trends

I hate it when people who are 50, or 55 or 60, describe themselves as “57 but youthful.” You see it in jobs and roommates wanted, on social networks. “57 but youthful WINK WINK” means “my birth certificate says I’m 57, but I ACT and LOOK, and FEEL like I’m—-47!”

The words obsequious and pandering come to mind.

Is being 40 years old innately and inherently better than being 50? What are the criteria? Better abs and more hair for men, and more sexual allure for women?

My position is this: Boomers were here first; there are more of us with more money than any other market segment. Tens of millions of us are 57 and we don’t have to apologize for it.

Either the Boomers who self-describe themselves as “57 but youthful” are out of synch with the generation at large, or I am, and I’d like to think it’s them.

The Good Ol’ Days Redux

June 16th, 2010
What Shall We Call Our Past?
What Shall We Call Our Past?

When my parent’s generation talked about how things were when they were growing up, they’d say “in my day.”

When my grandparents referred to their own formative years, they’d say “in the old days.”

And, now, it’s our turn.

How do Baby Boomers refer to their own good ol’ days? The word that’s emerging is “back in the day.” Don’t ask me why, how, or what it means. Just observe, and you’ll see it’s getting used– it seems an adequate and innocuous way of putting it; I, myself, use it, and I think I recently read a quote from Tom Petty, and he used that phrase, too.

Declining to retire

May 3rd, 2010
Now what?
Now what?

Novelist Mary Higgins Clark on NPR’s “Here & Now,” sounding just fine at 82, re: retirement: “What am I going to do, take up bridge?”

Sigourney Weaver hosts SNL Mar 20th

March 17th, 2010
You Look Fabulous!
You Look Fabulous!

Sure, being the “scientist” who made Avatar possible has its rewards, but 61 y/o Sigourney’s a SNL regular, and was just on in Oct.

When I was 30, the Saturday Night Live hosts were 30; now I’m 60, and the SNL hosts are 60.

Our generation is so big, and so rich, that everybody and everything, has to accommodate us.